Adbri aims for net-zero cement technologies


Peter Roberts
Contributor

Cement and lime manufacturer Adbri has launched an ambitious plan to decarbonise its emissions intensive processes and operations and has announced a goal of net zero emissions by 2050.

The company’s detailed net zero emissions roadmap released today calls for action on reducing emissions, developing new products and collaborating with Australian low emissions technology company Calix to test breakthrough zero emissions processes.

And the company has backed the plan by linking executive remuneration to both financial performance and its tough new sustainability targets.

Cement and lime processes are major producers of carbon dioxide with CO2 emitted as part of traditional processes.

The company’s lime exports to European aluminium producers in particular are threatened by looking EU regulations.

Adbri cement production

Adbri has committed itself to a short term target of a seven per cent absolute reduction in operational emissions by FY24 compared to the FY19 baseline.

Medium term targets are:

  • A 20 per cent reduction in cement emissions intensity (kg CO2e/tonne) by 2030 compared to a FY20 baseline
  • A 10 per cent cut in lime emissions by FY30
  • And 100 per cent zero emissions electricity supply by FY30.

And by 2050 the company aims to have net zero emissions for all its scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions.

To achieve this final goal Adbri partnered with manufacturing process company Calix in March last year.

Adbri today reaffirmed the two companies would co-develop a Calix calciner for lime production with CO2 capture in a five-year project.

The project will cover lime production of 30,000 tonnes a year and capture of 20,000 tonnes a year of CO2.

Unlike traditional lime kilns, Calix technology involves heating the kiln from the outside with renewable energy.

CO2 released from limestone in the process can easily be captured from the process gases.

Calix’s LEILAC technology for cement production is being tested in a full scale cement plant in Europe funded by the European Union and European cement producers.

While Adbri did not commit to utilising or testing the Calix process for cement its net zero roadmap said: “This could present a technically viable pathway to zero emissions manufacturing for lime and cement.”

This story was originally published by @AuManufacturing. You can subscribe to the @AuManufacturing newsletter here.

Do you know more? Contact James Riley via Email.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Related stories